Assessment at Cranmer

 

Assessment in the Early Years

How and When We Record

The Leuven Scales of Well-being and Involvement are used when observing children in their first weeks in Nursery and Reception. Once children reach a high level of well-being and involvement, and within their first six weeks of beginning school, Baseline Assessment is carried out. This is based on observations and interactions with children across all 17 Areas of Learning from the Early Year Profile.

Data is then collected termly and used as a formative tool that informs planning and interventions. Well-being and involvement levels are monitored throughout the year and assessments are based on observations of play, group activities and comments from parents.

In the summer term, children in Reception Classes are assessed against the Early Learning Goals in each Area of Learning and this is collected nationally.

 

Learning Journeys

Learning Journeys are kept for every child in Reception and Nursery and are a record of children’s progress throughout the year. Learning Journeys are a celebration of children’s work, a tool for informing assessment and a way to share learning with both children and parents. We aim to achieve a balance of guided, independent work, own learning as well as pupils and parent comments from across all Areas of Learning.

All adults play a vital role in assessment and contribute to Learning Journeys.

 

 

KS 1

Reading

In KS1, teacher assessments are made weekly during Shared Reading sessions with the class, Guided Reading sessions with a group and 1:1 reading with the teacher and child. This ongoing assessment is made using the Herts for Learning criteria. The criteria is used to determine the ‘Phase’ and ‘Step’ that a child is working at in relation to age-related expectations. Judgements are made using the Herts for Learning Criteria every term.

Running records are also used to assess children’s fluency and accuracy in reading and to determine children’s book bands.

In Year 2, children will begin to give written responses to their reading. This may be as a guided group activity or a whole-class reading comprehension. Children complete one formal, written reading comprehension paper during their KS1 Tests in May. A scaled score is published which is used to inform teacher judgement along with the statements listed in the ‘Interim Teacher Assessment Framework’.

Writing

In KS1, writing is assessed through evidence in children’s books. Teachers make their judgements based on writing across the curriculum. For each child, a range of samples will be used to provide evidence of writing for a variety of purposes. This ongoing assessment is made using the Herts for Learning criteria. The criteria is used to determine the ‘Phase’ and ‘Step’ that a child is working at in relation to age-related expectations. Judgements are made using the Herts for Learning Criteria every term.

At the end of Year 2, teachers also make a judgement on children’s writing based on the statements listed in the ‘Interim Teacher Assessment Framework’.

Maths

In KS1, Maths is  assessed through practical approaches to Maths in lessons, evidence in children’s books, children’s responses and through summative assessments such as arithmetic/rising stars unit tests.

Each child is assessed against the Herts for Learning Assessment criteria for Maths. This document provides a guidance on the progression of skills in writing, organised into these areas:

  • Working mathematically
  • Number
  • Measurement, geometry and statistics

‘Working mathematically’ refers to the skills required in ‘Phase A’ with regards to the child’s ability to:

  • Apply
  • Reason
  • Problem Solve

Judgements about the ‘steps’ in which children are working need to take into account all these aspects of mathematics as well as the fluency focus for that year group. The fluency focus states the complexity of numbers which children should be developing some fluency in terms of their understanding of the number system. If children find it difficult to engage with the numbers stated in the fluency focus, they are probably working at a lower step. Judgements are made using the Herts for Learning Criteria every term.

At the end of Year 2, teachers also make a judgement on children’s Maths based on the statements listed in the ‘Interim Teacher Assessment Framework.’ In Year 2, children will complete two formal, Mathematics papers during their KS1 Tests in May.   The first paper is an arithmetic paper. The second paper presents a range of mathematical reasoning and problem-solving questions. Each pupil will receive an overall result indicating whether or not a child has achieved the required standard on the test.

Science

Science is taught weekly in KS1 and combines Working Scientifically skills and developing Knowledge and Understanding.  Children learn through a wide range of practical activities, with some more formal recording in their books.  Teachers use ongoing assessment during lessons, particularly by focusing on children’s talk and language in Science activities, and by checking understanding by revisiting learning the following week.  This, combined assessing written work in science books, helps teachers make a judgement using the Herts for Learning Criteria.  

The Working Scientifically skills are taught and assessed across Year 1 and 2, so a final judgement is only made at the end of KS1. The Knowledge and Understanding aspect is assessed and judged at the end of each Year.   This final teacher assessment is submitted with the KS1 SATS data, as achieved standard, or not achieved standard.   

Phonics

Phonics is taught daily from Nursery until the start of Year 2. Teachers use ongoing assessment during daily sessions to make judgements on where children are working. Children are also assessed on a 1:1 basis each half-term with a focus first on oral blending and segmenting. This is followed by the assessment of grapheme-phoneme correspondence, blending to read and segmenting to spell.

In Year 1, children take part in the Phonics Screening Check in June. This assessment is carried out 1:1 with the child and class teacher. The pass mark is published following the check each year.

In Year 2, all children who did not pass the check in Year 1 take the Phonics Screening re-check.



KS2

Reading

In KS2, teacher assessments are made weekly during Shared Reading sessions with the class and Guided Reading sessions with a group. Teachers also set regular written reading comprehension papers to help inform their judgements. This ongoing assessment is made using the Herts for Learning criteria. The criteria is used to determine the ‘Phase’ and ‘Step’ that a child is working at in relation to age-related expectations. Judgements are made using the Herts for Learning Criteria every term.

At the end of Year 6, children take part in the Key Stage 2 Tests. They are required to complete a reading comprehension paper which is externally marked and a scaled score is published which is used to determine the outcomes for reading at the end of Key Stage Two.

Writing

In KS2, writing is assessed through evidence in children’s books. Teachers make their judgements based on writing across the curriculum. For each child, a range of samples will be used to provide evidence of writing for a variety of purposes. This ongoing assessment is made using the Herts for Learning criteria. The criteria is used to determine the ‘Phase’ and ‘Step’ that a child is working at in relation to age-related expectations. Judgements are made using the Herts for Learning Criteria every term.

At the end of Year 6, teachers also make a judgement on children’s writing based on the statements listed in the ‘Interim Teacher Assessment Framework’.

Maths

In KS2, Maths is  assessed through practical approaches to Maths in lessons, evidence in children’s books, children’s responses and through summative assessments such as arithmetic/rising stars unit tests.

Each child is assessed against the Herts for Learning Assessment criteria for Maths. This document provides a guidance on the progression of skills in writing, organised into these areas:

  • Working mathematically
  • Number
  • Measurement, geometry and statistics

 

‘Working mathematically’ refers to the skills required in ‘Phase B (Years 3 and 4) and Phase C (Years 5 and 6)’ with regards to the child’s ability to:

  • Apply
  • Reason
  • Problem Solve

Judgements about the ‘steps’ in which children are working need to take into account all these aspects of mathematics as well as the fluency focus for that year group. The fluency focus states the complexity of numbers which children should be developing some fluency in terms of their understanding of the number system. If children find it difficult to engage with the numbers stated in the fluency focus, they are probably working at a lower step. Judgements are made using the Herts for Learning Criteria every term.

At the end of Year 6, teachers also make a judgement on children’s Maths based on the statements listed in the ‘Interim Teacher Assessment Framework’. In Year 6, children will complete three formal, Mathematics papers during their KS2 Tests in May.   The first paper is an arithmetic paper. The second and third papers present a range of mathematical reasoning and problem-solving questions. Each pupil will receive an overall result indicating whether or not he or she has achieved the required standard on the test.

 

Science

Science is taught twice a week in KS2 and combines Working Scientifically skills and developing Knowledge and Understanding.  Children learn through a wide range of practical investigations and formally record explanations, diagrams and results in their Science books.  Teachers use ongoing assessment during lessons, particularly by focusing on children’s talk and language during practical activities, and by checking understanding by revisiting learning the following week. The focus is often on children explaining their understanding and teachers use a variety of resources, including Concept Cartoons to help assess the children’s understanding. This, combined assessing written work in science books, helps teachers make a judgement using the Herts for Learning Criteria.  

The Working Scientifically skills are taught and assessed across two years  (Year 3 and 4 as well as Years 5 and 6),  so a final judgement is only made at the end of the two years. The Knowledge and Understanding aspect is assessed and judged at the end of each year.  In Year 6 the final teacher assessment is submitted with their SATs data, as Achieved Standard, or Not Achieved Standard. There is no Summative test for science in Year 6.



KS2 SATs taken by Year Six. (Summative Assessment- marked externally)

SATs are undertaken by Year Six children at the beginning of the Summer term as a Summative assessment. Teachers can compare how well each child is doing with their peers, both in their school and across the country. They can also measure how much each child improves from one Key Stage to another and are used to predict the likelihood of children achieving specific results in their GCSEs.

In addition, headteachers, local authorities and the Department for Education use the results to help identify schools that are struggling and, if a school is doing really well, it can share what it's doing right with other schools.

The new Key Stage 2 tests 2016 was the first year of the new Key Stage 2 tests in Maths, Reading and Grammar, Punctuation and Spelling. The tests assess children against a national standard. This year’s tests are the first tests to reflect the New Primary Curriculum, which was introduced in 2014. Your child’s results in each test will be reported using a scaled score. A scaled score of 100 represents the expected standard for each test. If your child gets a scaled score of 100 or more it means they are working at or above the expected standard in the subject. If your child gets a scaled score of less than 100 it means that they may need more support to reach the expected standard. The highest scaled score possible is 120, and the lowest is 80. You can find more information on scaled scores at www.gov.uk/guidance/scaled-scores-at-key-stage-2 .

Teacher Assessment - end of Key Stage 2

In addition to taking the SATs tests, your child’s teacher will assess how well your child has done during the year in Reading, Writing, Maths and Science. Teachers will do this using a framework that describes what a child needs to do to be working at the expected standard in a subject. Your child’s teacher will base their assessment on the work that your child has done in class during Years Five and Six. For children who have completed the Key Stage 2 curriculum in writing, the teacher assessment will say one of 3 things:

  • your child is working towards the expected standard and needs some support to meet national expectations
  • your child is working at the expected standard for their age
  • your child is working at greater depth within the expected standard and has a strong understanding of the curriculum.

Teacher assessment from Years Three to Five is done in a Formative manner where children will be assessed as working either: -

  • Towards the expected standard ;  At the expected standard or At greaterdepth

In addition to this, Formative Assessment through Classroom Monitor (online resource)  for KS1 and KS2  for Core and Foundation Subjects are also conducted to support the assessment process.

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